Mural”Chopin in Warsaw”

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Project: Krzysztof Bagiński, Warsaw/Poland (Photo: Monika Saczyńska, 18. Mai 2013)

The mural “Chopin in Warsaw” was painted on the east wall of the house Górnośląska 8. It was fulfilled by Goodloking Studio as a part of the Warsaw City’s campaign ‘Frederic in Warsaw 200 years from a great move’. The target of the campaign was to remember that Chopin was deeply connected with Warsaw, where he spend the half part of his life (it means 20 years). He commended in his last will that his heart should rest in Warsaw (There is the urn with the Chopin’s heart in the Saint Cross Church, Krakowskie Przedmieście Street 3). The idea of Bagiński’s project was using simple symbols which were unambiguously connected with Chopin (a piano) and Warsaw (the Palace of Culture and Science).

(On the photo we can see a little “bonus”. The tooth, which was painted in the bottom part of the work, is a mark of vandalisem)

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“Three girls and a boy”

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Project: Wilfried Fitzenereiter, Berlin, Niemcy (Photo: Monika Saczyńska, 12 April 2015)

Bronze sculptures siting on the Spree bank opposite Berliner Dom (Berlin’s Cathedra) by the crossroads of Spreepromenade end St. Wolfgang-Straße. Three Girls and Boy are in the current localization from 1988. In 1977-1979 four statues were standing between Karl-Liebknecht-Straße end Palasthotel end they were a part of an another work. They were standing back to back in the middle of a fountain.

“Democracy Monument”

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Designed by Maeo Aphaiyawong, Bangkok, Thailand (photo: Gosia Głowacka, February 2016)

The Democracy Monument (Thai: อนุสาวรีย์ประชาธิปไตย Anusawari Prachathipatai) is a public monument in the centre of Bangkok, capital of Thailand. It occupies a traffic circle on the wide east-west Ratchadamnoen Klang Road, at the intersection of Dinso Road. The monument is roughly halfway between Sanam Luang, the former royal cremation ground in front of Wat Phra Kaew, and the temple of the Golden Mount (Phu Kao Thong)

The Democracy Monument (Thai: อนุสาวรีย์ประชาธิปไตย Anusawari Prachathipatai) is a public monument in the centre of Bangkok, capital of Thailand. It occupies a traffic circle on the wide east-west Ratchadamnoen Klang Road, at the intersection of Dinso Road. The monument is roughly halfway between Sanam Luang, the former royal cremation ground in front of Wat Phra Kaew, and the temple of the Golden Mount (Phu Kao Thong)
The monument was designed by Maeo Aphaiyawong, an architect whose brother, Khuang Aphaiyawong, was a leading member of Phibun’s government. The Italian sculptor Corrado Feroci, who became a Thai citizen and used the Thai name Silpa Bhirasi from the Second World War on, initially to avoid Japanese military ire, executed the relief sculptures around the base of the monument. He also provided the main sculpting for the renowned Lady Mo monument in the northeast Thailand city of Nakhon Ratchasima.

The building of the monument was highly unpopular at the time. Local residents and shopkeepers (mostly Chinese) were evicted from their homes and businesses with 60 days’ notice. The widening of Ratchadamnoen Road to create a ceremonial boulevard involved cutting down hundreds of shade trees, a serious matter in the days before air conditioning, given Bangkok’s torrid climate.

Design elements

The centrepiece of the monument  is a carved representation of a palm-leaf manuscript box holding the Thai Constitution of 1932, on top of two golden offering bowls above a round turret. The constitution is symbolically guarded by four wing-like structures, representing the four branches of the Thai armed forces—army, navy, air force and police—which carried out the 1932 coup.

The wings are 24 metres high, and this is also the radius of the base of the monument, marking the fact that the 1932 coup took place on 24 June. The central turret is three metres high, representing the month of June, which is the third month of the traditional Thai calendar. There were originally 75 small cannon around the outer ring of the monument, representing the year of the coup, 2475 in the Buddhist calendar. The six gates of the turret represent the six proclaimed policies of the Phibun regime: “independence, internal peace, equality, freedom, economy, and education.”

Facing outwards from the base of two of the wings are fountains in the form of naga, the protective snake creatures of Hindu and Buddhist mythology, although the sculptures resemble Western dragons more than traditional naga sculptures.

The relief sculptures at the base of the monument are propagandistic in their design. They depict the armed forces both as champions of democracy and as the personification of the Thai people. In the version of events depicted in these sculptures, the coup of 1932 was carried out by a united and idealistic Thai armed forces on behalf of the people, and had both the intention and effect of making Thailand a democracy. In the reliefs, civilians appear only as the grateful recipients of the heroism and benevolence of the armed forces.

The panel titled “Soldiers Fighting for Democracy” , shows a heroic and united armed forces doing battle (it is not clear against whom) for “democracy”. The panel titled “Personification of the People”, shows a soldier protecting the Thai people while they go about their civil pursuits. The mother with child at left is the only woman depicted anywhere at the Democracy Monument. The panel represents the view of the military regime in 1939 that the armed forces were ruling on behalf of the people.

The panel titled “Personification of Balance and Good Life” , represents the social ideology of the military regime. An allegorical figure representing the nation, seated in a Buddha-like posture (but not Buddha himself), holding a sword and a set of scales, representing the armed forces and justice respectively, sits in the centre, flanked by figures representing (from left) sport, education, religion, and the arts. The figure of “sport”, a naked man with a shot put, is wholly European in origin (source: Wikipedia)

“Greetings from Jerusalem Avenue”

Palma copy copy copy       Conceived  by Joanna Rajkowska,  Poland, Warsaw (photo: Krysia Kierebinski, August 2013)

Joanna Rajkowska´s solitary plastic Palm Tree standing in the center of Warsaw is the only element of the bigger and unfulfilled installation project „Greetings from Jerusalem Avenue”, which basic concept was to install the whole lane of palm trees. Its purpose was to remind Warsaw’s citizens about the Jewish community living here before the WW2. Location of the palm has its own meaning, one of the streets of the intersection is called Aleje Jerozolimskie (eng. Jeruzalem Avenue).

Now this intent is answered by only one date palm, the typical tree of Judea. Its reception was controversial; there were organizations and communities, which saw the palm as an evident Jewish symbol in the very heart of the city. They accused the project of evoking some extreme emotions and generating some dormant artificial scissions in the Polish society.The city´s authorities of that time supported the project but allowed it to last only for one year. However, the survey carried out by daily paper Gazeta Wyborcza proved that 75 per cent of Warsaw´s citizens preferred the palm to stay for good.

I set the tree and I treat it as an element of the communication between people, communication which is non-verbal and non-intellectual. Following the idea of the Journal of Dreams, I don´t want people to „understand” each other; it is impossible, I think. I want them to BE close to one another. Under the palm tree. Joanna Rajkowska

The photograph above is taken on the 1st of August just before 5 PM, the beginning hour of the Warsaw Uprising of 1944. Every year, at this particular moment all citizens of Warsaw gather to be together.

Title: Palm Tree
Artist: Joanna Rajkowska, b. 1968
Location: Warsaw, intersection between Nowy Świat and Al. Jerozolimskie, rondo Charlesa De Gaulle´a
Height: 15 m
Material: plastic an natural materials
Installation date: 12/12/201002