Podobenství s Lebkou (Parable With Skull)

Praga maj 2018 fot. Peter Georg Kozdon 2 (mail 13.09.18).JPGSculptor: Jaroslav Róna, Prague, Czech Republic (Photo: Peter Georg Kożdoń, Mai 2018)

Jaroslav Róna, who also created the Franz Kafka statue nearby, is a rather prolific surrealist sculptor. In the 1980s he helped found the Czech art group Tvrdohlaví (The Stubborn). He built Podobenství s Lebkou, aka “Parable with Skull” in 1993, a bronze sculpture of a beggar weighed down by a large skull resides on a thick slab of aging wood.

The sculpture used to be found at the eastern end of the Golden Lane by Prague Castle’s Daliborka Tower, where Dalibor of Kozojedy, known as the Robin Hood of Czechia, was said to have played the violin while waiting out his days.

Parable with Skull is based on one of Kafka’s characters—the “beggar, who, with the death rattle already in his throat, insists on dying on the doorstep” from The Bucket Rider. The sculpture tends to intrigue and even confuse those who visit the castle without prior knowledge of Róna’s surrealist works. There’s also a surprise at the rear end of the statue: the beggar’s dangling bronze testicles are displayed quite prominently, often shocking admirers of the piece.

Prague is a city known for its strange public sculptures, and Róna’s are among the strangest, but Parable with Skull isn’t a public work. To see the strange crawling man, one must pay admission to tour Prague Castle.

(Source: https://www.atlasobscura.com)

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Elections to the European Parliament will take place on 26th May. Let us not be like this beggar and let us not to allow the democracy in Poland to die on the doorstep of our home, which is a united Europe. Let us go to elections and vote for wise and responsible people. Enough demagogy and manipulation!

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“Slight Uncertainty”

Peter Georg Kozdon Praga maj 2018 (mail 23.01.19)Artist: Michal Trpak, Prague, Czech Republic (Photo: Peter Georg Kozdon, Mai 2018)

This sculpture, located at the crossroad of Na zbořenci and Odborů in the Praga district called Nové Město, is part of bigger composition “Slight Uncertainty” done by Michal Trpák.  In his installation artist puts a philosophical spin on the Mary Poppins flight by umbrella. The piece features many cement figures hanging dearly onto open umbrellas in a rainbow’s spectrum of colors, all of the individuals floating in an atrium-type space in the EBC office center in Prague. Uncertainty rests in the state of being, whether these figures are anticipating a rise – or even descent – with excitement or perhaps dread. The contrast of the heavy, material concrete contrasts the situational lightness captured by the installation. One thing that is certain: the dreamlike, thought-provoking, and inspirational effect of the colorful umbrellas.

(Source: https://www.gessato.com/slight-uncertainty-by-michal-trpak/)

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Today is the International Women’s Day. To all women and the men standing by their side, strength and perseverance in the fight for their rights.

“Robber Rumcajs”

WP_20180520_15_31_56_ProSculptor: František Vitásek, Frymburk, Czech Republic (Photo: Małgorzata Sachse, maj 2018)

The sculpture was made as part of the project “Together for Children” from 04-07/08/2014.

Rumcajs robber (org. O loupežníku Rumcajsovi) – a Czechoslovak animated series for children, based on a series of novels by Václav Čtvrtek. The series consisted of 39 episodes, its continuation was a new series called Cypisek – the son of robber Rumcajs from 1972.

The series tells about the vicissitudes of robber Rumcajs from the forest of Laholce and his family – wife Hanka and son Cypisek. The main theme of the series is the conflict between the robber and the Prince, who lives in the castle in the nearby town named Jiczyn.

In the Czech original fairytale, the wife of robber Rumcajs is named Manka.

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I love such robbers as they fearlessly defend their freedom and punished dishonest “princes”.

Smell of Christmas…

Prague 064.JPGInternal toilet door in the shop with gingerbread, Prague, Czech Republic (photo: Gosia Głowacka, 22.08.2014)

While Christmas time is filled with sweet smells of gingerbread and traditional dishes, the political world seems sour. Thinking of the president who signs in laws without reading them, the parliamentary majority excluding the minority, old sour men calling the shots and turning the clock backwards spoils this special time. May the sweet gingerbread smell make us forget these troubles for a bit. Merry Christmas to all of you! 🙂

“Before I die…”

Prague 130.JPGPrague, Czech Republic (photo: Gosia Głowacka, 22.08.2014)

Before I die

I would like to see people around who oftener smile at and help each other rather than swearing and harm one another …
I would like to reduce disparities in distributing goods of this world between the richest and the poorest
I would like people to understand that by destroying our beautiful planet they undercut the branch they sit on
I would like to travel to the farthest and most oriental corners of the world without fear that I might not come back alive (e.g. as a result of military operations carried out in these areas, epidemics, terrorist attacks etc.)
I would like that white is always white and black is black without necessity to prove it
I would like that my son grew into a wise, happy man as well as he will be surrounded by that kind of people
I would like that hate speech is replaced by LOVE speech

… so it seems that there are many more years of life ahead of me for these wishes to come true;). And you – what would you like / want to do / see / experience before your earthly journey will finish?

 

“Man Hanging Out”

Prague 050Sculpture by David Černý, Prague, Czech Republic (photo. Gosia Głowacka 22.08.2014)

Sigmund Freud was born in Frieburg which is now part of the Czech Republic.  Even during the most prolific times of his career, Frued suffered from a number of phobias including the fear of his own death.  Suffering from mouth cancer when he was 83, Freud had his close friend and doctor help him to commit suicide through administering morphine.

Artist David Cerny depicts Freud in this way to signify his constant struggle with fear of death.  Other interpretations suggest that the artist was personally challenging the status quo.

The sculpture became so popular that it was exhibited in other cities including London, Berlin, Rotterdam, Chicago, and Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Often mistaken as a suicide attempt, the sculpture has initiated calls to fire and police.

(source:http://www.civicartsproject.com)

“Piss”

Prague 083Made by: David Černý, Prague, Czech Republic (Photo: Gosia Głowacka, August 2013)

One of his brilliant yet controversial creations is installed at the Herget Brick Works in Prague’s Lesser Quarter (in front of Franz Kafka museum ). The two bronze urinating figures, each 210 centimeters high, pee into an enclosure the shape of the Czech Republic while turning their upper torsos and raising their penises. The stream of water writes quotes from legendary Prague residents. If the viewer sends a text to the number shown next to the sculptural grouping, the figures will write the message.

“Dancing Hause”

Prague 115Project: Vlado Milunića and Franka Gehry, Prague, Czech Republic (photo: Gosia Głowacka, August 2013)

The Dancing House (Czech: Tančící dům), or Fred and Ginger, is the nickname given to the Nationale-Nederlanden building on the Rašínovo nábřeží (Rašín Embankment) in Prague, Czech Republic. It was designed by the Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić in cooperation with Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot. The building was designed in 1992 and completed in 1996.
The very non-traditional design was controversial at the time because the house stands out among the Baroque, Gothic and Art Nouveau buildings for which Prague is famous, and in the opinion of some it does not accord well with these architectural styles. The then Czech president, Václav Havel, who lived for decades next to the site, had avidly supported this project, hoping that the building would become a center of cultural activity.
Gehry originally named the house Fred and Ginger (after the famous dancers Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers – the house resembles a pair of dancers)[2] but this nickname is now rarely used; moreover, Gehry himself was later “afraid to import American Hollywood kitsch to Prague”, and thus discarded his own idea.

The Dutch insurance company Nationale-Nederlanden (since 1991 ING Bank) agreed to sponsor the building of a house on site. The “super bank” chose Milunić as the lead designer and asked him to partner with another world-renowned architect to approach the process. The French architect Jean Nouvel turned down the idea because of the small square footage, but the well-known Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry accepted the invitation. Because of the bank’s excellent financial state at the time, it was able to offer almost unlimited funding for the project.[4] From their first meeting in 1992 in Geneva, Gehry and Milunić began to elaborate Milunić’s original idea of a building consisting of two parts, static and dynamic (“yin and yang”), which were to symbolize the transition of Czechoslovakia from a communist regime to a parliamentary democracy.

“Babies”

Prague 088

Made by: David Černý, Prague, Czech Republic (photo: Gosia Głowacka August 2013)

The ten dreamlike babies inching their way up the unconventional Žižkov Television Tower in Prague 3 were placed permanently on that eyesore during 2001. The grotesque infants are climbing a structure that jars the beauty of Prague’s skyline, a symbol of the Communist era, unable to reach adulthood, their growth stifled by this landmark of totalitarian rule. The outrageous babies also portray a bloated, surreal childhood. Some assert that Černý’s creations did not improve the looks of the Žižkov site: VirtualTourist.com even rated the TV tower as the second ugliest building in the world. Three bronze babies were also placed on Prague’s Kampa Island.